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Cliff Barrows, Billy Graham’s Longtime Musical Director, Dies at 93


Clifford Burton Barrows (April 6, 1923 – November 15, 2016) was a longtime music and program director for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association. He had been a part of the Graham organization since 1949. Barrows was best known as the host of Graham's weekly Hour of Decision radio program, and the song leader and choir director for the crusade meetings. WIKIPEDIA

 VIDEO: George Beverly Shea and Cliff Barrows reminisce during a Senior Celebration at The Cove in Asheville, NC on September 20, 2011 (the last time Bev Shea sang in public). These two have been in ministry together with their good friend, Billy Graham, for over 60 years. Watch as Bev Shea tells how he composed the music for I'd Rather Have Jesus. Enjoy the music and the stories! 
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Florence Agnes Henderson (February 14, 1934 – November 24, 2016) was an American actress and singer

Henderson started her career on the stage, performing in musicals, such as the touring production of Oklahoma! and South Pacific at Lincoln Center. She debuted on Broadway in the musical Wish You Were Here in 1952, and later starred on Broadway in the long-running 1954 musical, Fanny (888 performances) in which she originated the title role. Henderson, along with Bill Hayes, appeared in the Oldsmobile commercials from 1958 through 1961 on The Patti Page Show for which Oldsmobile was the sponsor. Henderson also appeared on Broadway in The Girl Who Came to Supper (1963). In 1962, she won the Sarah Siddons Award for her work in Chicago theatre, and the same year became the first woman to guest host The Tonight Show in the period after Jack Paar left as the show's host, and before Johnny Carson began his 30 years as the show's longest serving host in October of 1962. She also joined the ranks of what was then called "The Today Girl" on NBC's long running morning show, doing weather and light news, a position also once held by Barbara Walters. WIKIPEDIA VIDEO Florence Henderson sings "My Love" on Hollywood Palace 03/04/1967

Ida Levin ( 1963 - 19 NOV 2016)


American concert violinist Ida Levin has passed away after a lengthy battle with leukemia – aged just 53. Ms Levin made her professional debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, aged 10, and went on to receive a prestigious Leventritt Award and an Avery Fisher Career Grant. Levin taught at the Sander Vegh International Chamber Music Academy in Prague and was a former faculty member of Harvard University and the European Mozart Academy. An active concert performer and recitalist, Levin performed throughout the world at such venues as the 92nd Street Y, London's Wigmore Hall, the Morgan Library, and Avery Fisher Hall to name just a few. Internationally, she performed in England, France, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic and Israel. She was also an active performer of chamber music and a member of the Boston Chamber Music Society. She also regularly played in Open Chamber Music in Cornwall, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society and Da Camera of Houston. She died of leukemia in November 2016 at the age of 53. WIKIPEDIA

 VIDEO: 2014 Winter Festival violinist Ida Levin talks about her love for Tchaikovsky and what makes his second string quartet unique as she finishes up the complete cycle of Tchaikovsky string quartets that she began during the 2012 Summer Festival. 

Jules Eskin, Cellist With Boston Symphony Orchestra, Dies at 85


Jules Louis Eskin (October 20, 1931 – November 15, 2016) was an American cellist who was the principal cellist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He was born in Philadelphia. With conductor Seiji Ozawa, he is known for solo performances of well-known works by Johannes Brahms, Gabriel Fauré, and Beethoven. Prior to joining the Boston Symphony Orchestra, he spent three years with the Cleveland Orchestra under George Szell. He also played for the Boston Chamber Players and Burton Quintet Five. Eskin died at the age of 85 on November 15, 2016 in Brookline, Massachusetts from cancer. VIDEO: NYTimes Obit

 VIDEO: Gabriel Faurè : Elegie op.24 for Cello and Orchestra - Jules Eskin, cello and Seiji Ozawa and Boston Symphony Orchestra.
 

Mose Allison, Jazz and Blues musician , Dies at 89


Mose John Allison, Jr. (November 11, 1927 – November 15, 2016) was an American jazz blues pianist, singer and songwriter. Allison wrote some 150 songs. His performances were described as being "delivered in a casual conversational way with a melodic southern accented tone that has a pitch and range ideally suited to his idiosyncratic phrasing, laconic approach and ironic sense of humour". WIKIPEDIA VIDEO... Mose Allison, Jazz piano player. Mose Allison was honored as one of the 2013 Jazz Masters by the National Endowment for the Arts at Lincoln Center on January 14, 2013. The NEA Jazz Masters Fellowship is the highest honor that our nation bestows on jazz artists. Each year since 1982, the program has elevated to its ranks a select number of living legends who have made exceptional contributions to the advancement of jazz.

Al Caiola, Guitarist on Themes for 'Bonanza' and 'The Magnificent Seven,' Dies at 96

Alexander Emil "Al" Caiola (September 7, 1920 – November 9, 2016) was a guitarist, composer and arranger who spanned a variety of music genres including jazz, country, rock, western, and pop. He recorded over fifty albums and worked with some of the biggest names in music during the 20th century, including Elvis Presley, Ferrante & Teicher, Frank Sinatra, Percy Faith, Buddy Holly, Mitch Miller, and Tony Bennett. During World War II Caiola played with the United States Marine Corps 5th Marine Division (United States) Band that also included Bob Crosby. Caiola served in the Battle of Iwo Jima as a stretcher bearer. WIKIPEDIA

Hungarian pianist and conductor Zoltan Kocsis dies at age 64


BUDAPEST, Hungary — Zoltan Kocsis, a famed pianist and conductor and musical director of the Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra, has died at age 64. The Philharmonic said Kocsis died Sunday afternoon, 6 NOV 2016. No specific cause of death was given, but Kocsis underwent major heart surgery in 2012. In October, 2016, the orchestra announced that he was suffering from poor health and, following doctors’ orders, cancelling most of his concerts to rest and recuperate.
  Zoltán Kocsis 30 May 1952 – 6 November 2016
He was a Hungarian virtuoso pianist, conductor, and composer. Born in Budapest, he began his musical studies at the age of five and continued them at the Béla Bartók Conservatory in 1963, studying piano and composition. In 1968 he was admitted to the Franz Liszt Academy of Music, where he was a pupil of Pál Kadosa, Ferenc Rados and György Kurtág, graduating in 1973. He won the Hungarian Radio Beethoven Competition in 1970, and made his first concert tour of the United States in the following year. He received the Liszt Prize in 1973, and the Kossuth Prize in 1978. Kocsis performed with the Berlin Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, the Staatskapelle Dresden, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philharmonic. He recorded the complete solo piano works and works with piano and orchestra of Béla Bartók. In 1990, his recording of Debussy's Images won "The Gramophone" Instrumental Award for that year. He won another in 2013 in the chamber category with Bartók works. American critic Harold C. Schonberg praised Kocsis' technique and piano tone. Kocsis co-founded the Budapest Festival Orchestra in 1983. He was the musical director of the Hungarian National Philharmonic. WIKIPEDIA

VIDEO...Mozart K331 Piano Sonata A major, Kocsis Zoltán fortepiano